How Much Money Should I Take on Holiday to Egypt?

How Much Money Should I Take on Holiday to Egypt?

With its majestic pyramids, magnificent monuments, the lush delta and the desert, and let’s not forget about the mighty Nile, Egypt is a fascinating country attracting millions of tourists each year. And while it had its fair share of turmoil in the recent times, it remains one of the most welcoming and accessible African nations. Not only is Egypt packed with jaw-dropping attractions, but it’s also incredibly cheap to visit.

How much money should I take on holiday to Egypt?

You may be surprised to learn that it is highly possible to visit Egypt on only £60 per day and about £420 for a whole week. Yes, it really is that affordable!

Everything from accommodation to specialised tours falls within any kind of budget, be it small.

Let’s go through the main daily expenses you’ll be making in Egypt so you can figure out how much money you should bring with you on your holiday.

Accommodation

All throughout Egypt, you will find top-rated accommodation at some incredibly cheap prices. Backpackers will be thrilled to know that a bed in a hostel dorm costs about £4, and they’re not shabby at all!

If you’d rather spend the night somewhere nicer, know that a 3-star hotel charges an average £15 per night for a double room. But you could easily upgrade to a 4-star or even a 5-star hotel, for which you would still pay way less than other countries you’ve visited so far. There are 5-star hotels in Sharm El Sheikh charging as little as £20 per night for a double room!

Food

Egyptian food is tasty but as a tourist, you may have trouble finding a good place to eat traditional dishes. Your best bet is to ask a local where the best food in the city you’re staying in can be found. If the locals eat there, then it’s the perfect place for you too. There are many restaurants opened for tourists where you may still have a nice meal, but it’s not really the food the locals are eating. It would be a shame not to taste the true Egyptian cuisine.

The food in Egypt is not as spicy as you’d expect, and there’s an abundance of vegetarian options too. Some of the foods you can try if you want to keep your expenses on the low include sandwiches (about 15p), falafel (about 50p), kushari (about 80p), and shawarma (about £1).

A meal at a midrange restaurant with drinks included would cost you about £5-£10 per person, so eating well on just a few pounds is something every traveler can manage.

After dinner, it’s common for Egyptians to hang out at tea shop puffing on sheesha. If you’re a smoker or don’t mind the passive smoke, you should definitely check these places out. A tea and a sheesha usually cost about £1 together.

Transportation

The public transportation system in Cairo includes buses and metros. The buses are the cheapest but it’s hard to figure them out. But for an average 5p a ticket, maybe it’s not that bad. The metro is packed but more easy to work out, and single rides are about 15p.

If joining the crowds doesn’t sound too appealing, you can always take a taxi. But be on the lookout for scammers.

Getting from Cairo to other parts of Egypt means you’ll either take the train or the bus. The train can be confusing to figure out, but the trips are very affordable, a journey from Cairo to Luxor costing about £16 per person in 2nd class.

Take the bus to reach places inaccessible by train, such as the Siwa Oasis. Tickets are generally well under £10 per person.

Attractions

You’ll find many free attractions in Cairo such as the Hanging Church, Province of El-Fayoum, Ben Ezra Synagogue, and Ahmed Ben Tulun Mosque. The entry ticket to most of the pyramids costs around £1 per person, the most expensive to visit being the Great Pyramid of Cheops at about £4 per person.

In Luxor, the Colossi of Memnon is free to visit, while other attractions such as the Valley of the Kings cost about £3. In Aswan, you’ll pay about £2 to visit a temple or a museum. In Alexandria and other cities, the prices are even lower. Even if you go crazy and visit everything there is to see in a city, you’d probably still pay less than £15 on the overall tour of museums, temples, and tombs.

Tipping

One of the first words you’ll learn in Egypt is baksheesh.’’ This means you’re expected to tip, but you would’ve probably figured this out yourself. Tipping is customary here, it’s actually expected everywhere. Always keep small change and tip about 5 to 10 percent for good service. Nonetheless, don’t be gullible and learn to say no’’ to people demanding you money when there’s really no need to pay extra.

Haggling

Buying something in Egypt for a fair price can be a struggle. The initial prices most vendors ask you for are downright astronomical considering how cheap those products are. Since haggling is a way of life here, it’s expected you try to knock those prices down. Don’t be afraid to speak up before paying anyone anything. You may be asked £20 for a t-shirt that’s actually worth not even a £1 there. This is how shopping works in Egypt.

Also, before paying anything, ask the vendor what currency he is quoting you. Most Egyptians quote tourists in pounds’’, so you need to clear with them whether they’re talking about Egyptian pounds or British pounds.

Wrapping Up

If you don’t visit too many attractions and just hang around the city sightseeing and trying the local cuisine, you could spend as little as £15 on accommodation, transportation, meals, and a few entry tickets!

However, we suggest bringing at least £25 for each day of travel just to be sure you can afford everything.

You’ll also want to do a bit of shopping, and while most souvenirs are affordable, you can find luxury items in Egypt as well. So be sure to take into account every expense you plan to make.

Holiday ClassEstimated Amount Needed Per Day (Per Person)
Budget£60 Per Day
Mid-range£200 Per Day
High-end£500 Per Day
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